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National Organizations

The following list is meant to highlight just a few of the national organizations aimed at empowering women. This list is by no means exhaustive, but can serve as a starting point by which you can get involved with women's organizations on a national level. Each website listed also contains additional resources and involvement opportunities.

American Association of University Women

AAUW has been empowering women as individuals and as a community since 1881. For more than 130 years, we have worked together as a national grassroots organization to improve the lives of millions of women and their families.

AAUW's strategic initiatives include education and training, economic security, and leadership. They are involved in research, campus initiatives, STEM education, public policy, case support, educational funding, forging global connections, leadership development, and salary negotiation. 

National Organization for Women

As the grassroots arm of the women’s movement, the National Organization for Women is dedicated to its multi-issue and multi-strategy approach to women’s rights, and is the largest organization of feminist grassroots activists in the United States. NOW has hundreds of chapters and hundreds of thousands of members and activists in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Since our founding in 1966, NOW’s purpose is to take action through intersectional grassroots activism to promote feminist ideals, lead societal change, eliminate discrimination, and achieve and protect the equal rights of all women and girls in all aspects of social, political, and economic life.

National Women's Council

The mission of the National Women's council is to promote economic, political, and workplace equality through nation-wide programming, research, conferences and symposiums, and recognition through annual awards ceremonies. 

National Women's Political Caucus

The National Women's Political Caucus is a multi-partisan grassroots organization dedicated to increasing women’s participation in the political process. NWPC recruits, trains and supports pro-choice women candidates for elected and appointed offices at all levels of government. In addition to financial donations, the Caucus offers campaign training for candidates and campaign managers, as well as technical assistance and advice. State and local chapters provide support to candidates running at state and local levels by helping raise money and providing crucial hands-on volunteer assistance.

National Women's Health Network

The National Women’s Health Network (NWHN) was founded in Washington, DC, in 1975 to change the conversation about women’s health. We are consumer activists, supported by a national membership of thousands of individuals. We shape policy and support consumer health decisions; monitor the actions of Federal regulatory and funding agencies, the health care industry, and the health professions; identify and expose health care abuses; and mobilize grassroots action for women’s health. To safeguard our independence as a trusted voice on women health, the NWHN chooses not to accept financial support from the pharmaceutical industry, medical device manufacturers, or insurance companies.

National Women's Studies Association

Established in 1977, the National Women's Studies Association has as one of its primary objectives promoting and supporting the production and dissemination of knowledge about women and gender through teaching, learning, research and service in academic and other settings.

Our commitments are to: illuminate the ways in which women’s studies are vital to education; to demonstrate the contributions of feminist scholarship that is comparative, global, intersectional and interdisciplinary to understandings of the arts, humanities, social sciences and sciences; and to promote synergistic relationships between scholarship, teaching and civic engagement in understandings of culture and society.

NWSA recognizes that women's studies is broader than what happens in the classroom and acknowledges women's centers staff as feminist educators. Campus-based women's centers have a long history of working together with women's studies to transform the curriculum, the campus environment, and society at large.

Through their scholarship and pedagogy our members actively pursue knowledge to promote a just world in which all persons can develop to their fullest potential—one free from ideologies, systems of privilege or structures that oppress or exploit some for the advantage of others. The Association has more than 2,000 individual and 350 institutional members working in varied specialties across the United States and around the world.